Bangkok

Bangkok

Bangkok is the capital city of Thailand. According to the 2010 census, Bangkok has almost 8.3 million residents. Many multinational corporations have located their regional headquarters in Bangkok.

Thailand

Central Region

  • Children in Bangkok’s slums have to deal with the ill effects of air pollution. Children in Bangkok’s slums have to deal with the ill effects of air pollution.
  • Each week, children enjoy gathering in clean, safe child development centers, where they participate in a variety of learning activities. Each week, children enjoy gathering in clean, safe child development centers, where they participate in a variety of learning activities.
  • Education is vital for a child to escape poverty. Sponsored children receive educational support and hope for a better future. Education is vital for a child to escape poverty. Sponsored children receive educational support and hope for a better future.
  • In Bangkok, slums can be found built over sewage canals or still-active train tracks. In Bangkok, slums can be found built over sewage canals or still-active train tracks.
  • Children in the Compassion program have the opportunity to grow in every way: mind, body, heart and spirit. Children in the Compassion program have the opportunity to grow in every way: mind, body, heart and spirit.
  • Compassion-sponsored children learn social skills, resulting in lifelong tools for healthy relationships. Compassion-sponsored children learn social skills, resulting in lifelong tools for healthy relationships.
  • More-fortunate children have homes made of concrete and wood, like this one. More-fortunate children have homes made of concrete and wood, like this one.
 
THAILAND OVERVIEW

Population

67,741,401

Religion

Buddhism

Weather

 
A Glimpse of Poverty in Thailand's Central Region Thailand Overview
  • Bangkok, the country’s capital, is located in central Thailand. Twenty-two percent of the Thai population lives in this sprawling city.
  • Scattered throughout the capital city are many slums, which members of the poorest classes call home. Children living here walk along filthy gutters and pick their way through trash-strewn streets on their way to school.
  • Education is provided by the government, but parents’ debts and low wages often keep children from having the uniforms, books and tutoring needed to excel.
  • Child abuse is another common problem in the city slums.
  • In Thailand’s central rural areas outside Bangkok, children in poverty face similar issues with education, as well as with drugs and sex.
  • As pressures from peer groups increase, children find themselves in dangerous circumstances where drugs are prevalent, adults are frequently absent, and unsafe sex occurs regularly.
LIFE
In Thailand's Central Region

Geography & Climate

  • Thailand is the geographical heart of southeastern Asia, occupying the western half of the Indochinese Peninsula and the northern two-thirds of the Malay Peninsula.
  • Its neighbors are Myanmar, Laos, Cambodia and Malaysia.
  • At 198,120 square miles, Thailand is roughly the size of France and slightly more than twice the size of Wyoming.
  • Thailand contains six geographical regions, based on natural features, basic resources, as well as human cultural patterns.
  • Thailand can be extremely hot and soggy, with high temperatures, high humidity and substantial rainfall.
  • Its tropical climate is divided into three seasons: cool in November to February, hot in March to May, and rainy in June to October.
  • Nationwide, temperatures normally range from an average annual high of 100.4 degrees to a low of 66 degrees.

Economy

Thailand is the second-largest economy in southeastern Asia, after Indonesia.

Primary industries include automobile manufacturing, financial services, electronic appliances and tourism.

The country’s unemployment rate is very low (0.7 percent) due to a large proportion of population working in subsistence agriculture or in other vulnerable jobs.

The population living below poverty is 13.2 percent.

The child labor (ages 5-14) rate is 8 percent.

The primary economic activity of central Thailand is rice farming.

Children at Home

Homes in Bangkok’s slums are crude constructions of wood or cement, with corrugated iron roofs.

Children at home

These dwellings are usually no larger than 9 feet by 16 feet, sometimes accommodating up to 15 family members.

Typically, several houses share a community latrine.

Home life in the slums is difficult for many children, since child abuse is common.

COMMUNITY
Thailand Community
Issues and Concerns
  • The few jobs available for adults in the city slums are primarily factory work, taxi driving, construction and other day-labor positions.
  • Since wages fall short of meeting basic needs, about 80 percent of families are in debt.
  • People in the slums often become involved in violent crime, drug trafficking and substance abuse. Child abuse is also an issue in these desperate settings.
  • Children’s health in the crowded slums is always at risk. Mosquito-borne dengue fever is a problem, as are illnesses associated with the lack of safe water and an extremely polluted environment.
  • Parents cannot afford to take their children to see a doctor.
Local Needs and Challenges

Jobs

Working primarily in factories or as day laborers, people in Bangkok earn more money than those in Thailand’s rural areas – about U.S.$6 to $11 per day. Still, this is hardly enough for a family’s survival.

Health

In addition to not having needs for nutrition, medical care and education met, many children must fend for themselves while their parents work.

Child abuse

Children are vulnerable to exploitation and abuse, a common problem in Bangkok’s slums.

EDUCATION
Thailand education
Schools and Education
  • The school year in central Thailand runs from May to March and is divided into two semesters: May to October and November to March.
  • Elementary school and secondary school last six years each.
  • Although the government provides free education, parents struggle to pay the additional costs of uniforms, textbooks and transportation.
  • With 40-plus students per class, the quality of public education is low.
At the Compassion Child Development Center

Combating the obstacles children face in central Thailand are Compassion church partners, strategically positioned within the communities they serve.

At their church-based Compassion centers, children learn how to protect themselves from abuse. When abuse occurs, child workers provide legal aid as well as personal counseling and emotional aid.

Compassion centers in this region also work closely with parents, teaching financial management so they can provide for their children’s education and nourishment.

Staff ensure that children know they are welcome to spend time at the center, where they can escape their cramped quarters in the slums and find a caring environment ready to protect them and guide them out of poverty.

What Compassion Sponsorship Provides

In partnership with local churches, Compassion is bringing help and hope to children in need in central Thailand, providing them with:

  • regular nutritious meals and snacks
  • health checkups and medical care as needed
  • the support needed to attend school
  • health and hygiene training
  • access to special services like surgeries and disaster relief
  • mentoring to help children discover their incredible value as God’s children