Mexican Food Recipes

Mexican Food Recipes
Mexico

Rural Region

  • A farmer surveys his crops in a rural community in Mexico. Farmers depend on good weather for their harvests. A farmer surveys his crops in a rural community in Mexico. Farmers depend on good weather for their harvests.
  • Children in the Compassion program have the opportunity to grow in every way: mind, body, heart and spirit. Children in the Compassion program have the opportunity to grow in every way: mind, body, heart and spirit.
  • Compassion-assisted child development centers give students a chance to study, receive tutoring and participate in vocational training. Compassion-assisted child development centers give students a chance to study, receive tutoring and participate in vocational training.
  • Sponsored children regularly write to their sponsors. And they are so encouraged when they receive letters back from their sponsors. Sponsored children regularly write to their sponsors. And they are so encouraged when they  receive letters back from their sponsors.
  • Many homes in rural areas are simple wood structures with grass-thatched roofs and dirt floors, offering little protection from weather. Many homes in rural areas are simple wood structures with grass-thatched roofs and dirt floors, offering little protection from weather.
  • Compassion offers children a safe place to study and play and encourages family members to take an active role in their children’s lives. Compassion offers children a safe place to study and play and encourages family members to take an active role in their children’s lives.
  • In Mexico’s rural regions, children are expected to help out not only around the house but in the fields that their families cultivate. In Mexico’s rural regions, children are expected to help out not only around the house but in the fields that their families cultivate.
 
MEXICO OVERVIEW

Population

120,286,655

Religion

Roman Catholic

Weather

 
A Glimpse of Poverty in Rural Mexico Rural Mexico
  • Children in rural communities normally help their families with home duties that may be hard for children their age.
  • They feed farm animals or gather firewood in the forest. Sometimes, they care for sheep outside in the fields or take care of their little siblings.
  • Some of the problems these communities face are a lack of employment and low education levels. Children attend school but may only complete elementary school.
  • The lack of education leads to a lack of job opportunities.
  • There are many teenage mothers, single mothers and single-parent homes, as fathers migrate to find better job opportunities.
  • Another problem is alcohol abuse. Children end up neglected and abandoned by their parents and left under the care of older siblings or grandparents.
  • Many single mothers work as maids or service providers.
  • Children often grow up lonely, with low self-esteem and malnourished.
LIFE
In Rural Mexico

Geography & Climate

  • Mexico is located in one of the Earth’s most dynamic tectonic areas. It is a part of the circum-Pacific “Ring of Fire” — a region of active volcanism and frequent seismic activity.
  • Among its towering volcanic peaks are Citlaltépetl (18,406 feet) and the active volcano Popocatépetl (17,930 feet).
  • Mexico is bounded to the west and south by the Pacific Ocean, to the east by the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea, and to the southeast by Guatemala and Belize.
  • Because of its vast size and topographic diversity, Mexico has a wide array of climatic conditions.

Economy

Although one-quarter of Mexico’s population lives in rural areas, more than 60 percent of the extreme poor live there.

Many adults migrate from rural Mexico, not only to larger cities within Mexico, but also to the United States.

The U.S. recession has affected many of the families left behind in small rural towns in Mexico. In 2009, money transfers from the United States to Mexico dropped 20 percent.

Many rural families, with few resources beyond their small farm plots, depend on money sent from relatives who have left the area. When that money stops coming, hunger and desperation increase.

The average daily salary in rural communities is U.S.$4, and nearly half of rural residents are unemployed.

Children at Home

Children in rural communities in Mexico live in small houses made of local, inexpensive materials, including adobe bricks and wood.

Children at home

Most homes have a common area, a bedroom, a latrine with no running water, and an outdoor smoke kitchen - a small lean-to where families build cooking fires.

Women or children usually gather and carry wood to build the fire. Fires are built early in the morning, and mothers and daughters often boil corn to make tortillas at dawn.

COMMUNITY
Mexico Rural Community
Issues and Concerns
  • Families in rural Mexico tend to be larger than in urban areas, with an average of three to six children. Multiple generations commonly live together, with grandparents serving as heads of the family.
  • Few rural communities rely on agriculture as their main source of income because individual plots of land are too small to support families. However, droughts and heavy rains still greatly affect a community’s food supply and finances.
  • Common health issues for children in rural Mexico include diabetes, parasites and infections.
  • Health clinics are usually far away, and families often must rely on often-unsafe buses for transportation.
Local Needs and Challenges

Malnutrition

During good harvest seasons, rural families have plenty to eat. But when the harvest is meager due to a lack or overabundance of rain, malnutrition is the norm.

Food insecurity

Even with good harvests, food typically runs out before the next harvest, and parents struggle to meet their children’s nutritional needs year-round.

Water/sanitation-related illness

Rural children also commonly suffer from illnesses caused by unsafe water and inadequate sanitation.

EDUCATION
Indigenous education
Schools and Education
  • Education services are scarce and insufficient in rural Mexico.
  • In many families, children drop out of school to supplement their family’s income by working on the small plots of land their families farm.
  • Most communities offer no education beyond junior high.

Compassion Mexico works to ensure that every registered child is able to attend school, and it provides additional support, including tutoring, at the child development centers.

At the Compassion Child Development Center

Child development centers in rural communities provide registered children with a place to learn, grow and study.

Children who have never had easy access to clean water, health care or continuing education are provided access to these necessities.

Compassion-assisted children attend health classes, tutoring sessions and Bible studies at the center. They also spend time writing to and praying for their sponsors.

What Compassion Sponsorship Provides

In partnership with local churches, Compassion is bringing real help and hope to impoverished children in rural Mexico, providing:

  • regular nutritious meals and snacks
  • health checkups and medical care as needed
  • the support needed to attend school
  • parental education in which parents are made aware of the importance of schooling for their children
  • programs for teenagers to prevent alcoholism and teen pregnancies, as well as programs about single parenting
  • income-generation workshops to help get vocational training that will help them become self-reliant in the future
  • lessons about the Word of God and the opportunity to discover Jesus’ love and gift of salvation