Where is Uganda

Where is Uganda is a common question. Uganda is located in the eastern part of Africa. The countries that surround Uganda are Kenya, South Sudan, Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda, and Tanzania. More information on how to answer the question, "where is Uganda", and many other facts about Uganda can be found on Compassion International's country information page for Uganda.

Uganda

Western Region

  • Daily, people leave their villages and gather in nearby towns to look for whatever work they can find. Daily, people leave their villages and gather in nearby towns to look for whatever work they can find.
  • To help fight malnutrition, Compassion centers provide nutritious meals and snacks on program activity days. To help fight malnutrition, Compassion centers provide nutritious meals and snacks on program activity days.
  • The Compassion curriculum enables tutors to provide the learning activities children need to overcome poverty and achieve a brighter future. The Compassion curriculum enables tutors to provide the learning activities children need to overcome poverty and achieve a brighter future.
  • The task of collecting water falls to women and children. Daily, they spend hours walking to the nearest source. The task of collecting water falls to women and children. Daily, they spend hours walking to the nearest source.
  • Homes of poor families are typically simple, sparsely furnished structures made of mud walls and thatched roofs. Homes of poor families are typically simple, sparsely furnished structures made of mud walls and thatched roofs.
  • Children enjoy attending program activity days at their Compassion centers, where they can develop their physical and social skills. Children enjoy attending program activity days at their Compassion centers, where they can develop their physical and social skills.
  • Thanks to caring sponsors and a program that is Christ-centered, children have the opportunity to experience God's love firsthand. Thanks to caring sponsors and a program that is Christ-centered, children have the opportunity to experience God's love firsthand.
 
UGANDA OVERVIEW

Population

35,918,915

Religion

Christian

Weather

 
A Glimpse of Poverty in Western Uganda Uganda Overview
  • Most families depend on subsistence farming. But with primitive tools and the lack of irrigation, fertilizers and modern farming techniques, their results vary.
  • Some families also raise a few cattle to supplement their meager income.
  • Low income levels mean that families usually can’t afford to educate their children, especially because school fees are high in this region.
  • Children who start school in grade one typically don’t make it past the sixth grade.
  • Parents often encourage girls to drop out of school and get married in their early teens to collect money from the groom’s family for the traditional “bride price.”
  • Sexual promiscuity among teens is a rampant problem, with 57 percent of Ugandan girls having their first sexual encounter before the age of 18.
  • As a result, there is a high incidence of HIV infection and babies being raised by poor, single teen mothers.
COMMUNITY
Uganda Community
Issues and Concerns
  • Uganda’s western region has country’s highest number of reported cases of child abuse.
  • Children here, more than anywhere else in the country, are subjected to sexual exploitation, neglect and child labor.
  • Unpredictable weather in the area can lead to disaster. For example, early in 2010, the region experienced unusually heavy rains; the rains led to mudslides and the loss of about 20 lives.
Local Needs and Challenges

Secondary education expenses

A particular challenge for children in Uganda’s western region is the high cost of a secondary school education, which is out of reach for most poor families.

Abuse

Children here are vulnerable to rising rates of abuse and neglect.

Child-headed homes

Many children, orphaned by HIV or AIDS or abandoned by their parents, have to fend for themselves. It is common to find the oldest child in a family caring for his or her younger siblings as the head of the household.

EDUCATION
Uganda education
Schools and Education
  • The school year in Uganda comprises three terms: February through April, the end of May through mid-August, and early September to late November.
  • Students typically attend school about 250 days each year.
  • Among Uganda’s population, only 66 percent of those age 15 and over are able to read or write.
  • Among women, fewer than 58 percent are literate.

Compassion Uganda works to ensure that every registered child is able to attend school, and it provides additional support, including tutoring, at the child development centers.

At the Compassion Child Development Center

Compassion serves children in Uganda’s western region through numerous church-based child development centers. These centers are havens of love and learning for registered children.

Here, children receive nutritious meals, hygiene training, and tutoring to attain standard academic milestones.

They are also encouraged to develop their talents and abilities.

Most important, children learn about the love of God and gift of salvation in Christ.

What Compassion Sponsorship Provides

In partnership with local churches, Compassion is bringing real help and hope to impoverished children in western Uganda, providing:

  • regular nutritious meals and snacks
  • health checkups and medical care as needed
  • school fees and other needs (such as uniforms and supplies) to ensure that children stay in school
  • tutoring at Compassion centers to help children excel in their studies
  • learning activities to promote sexual purity among assisted children, including lessons about their great value to God and His plan for healthy relationships
  • Bible studies and, at many centers, mentoring by caring Christian adults from the partner church
  • training and awareness-raising events for caregivers to improve their parenting skills and help ensure children are protected from bad influences
  • Bible-based HIV prevention education for children and caregivers
  • special interventions, such as nutritional support and medical treatment for those affected by HIV