Uganda Map

Uganda Map

Uganda map shows this landlocked country in the eastern part of Africa. The Uganda map shows that the country is bordered by Kenya, South Sudan, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, and Tanzania. The southern part of Uganda includes Lake Victoria, which Uganda shares with Kenya and Tanzania.

Uganda

Eastern Region

  • Some caregivers look for work in the towns in eastern Uganda, but unemployment is high throughout the region. Some caregivers look for work in the towns in eastern Uganda, but unemployment is high throughout the region.
  • Children are provided regular nutritious meals at their Compassion centers to help fight malnutrition. Children are provided regular nutritious meals at their Compassion centers to help fight malnutrition.
  • Education is vital for a child to escape poverty. Sponsored children receive educational support and hope for a better future. Education is vital for a child to escape poverty. Sponsored children receive educational support and hope for a better future.
  • Children in the Compassion program have the opportunity to grow in every way: mind, body, heart and spirit. Children in the Compassion program have the opportunity to grow in every way: mind, body, heart and spirit.
  • Children enjoy coming to their Compassion centers — havens of learning, love and acceptance. Children enjoy coming to their Compassion centers — havens of learning, love and acceptance.
  • Homes of poor families in eastern Uganda are usually simple mud structures with dirt floors and thatched or metal roofs. Homes of poor families in eastern Uganda are usually simple mud structures with dirt floors and thatched or metal roofs.
  • This region suffers from extremes of drought and flooding, which frequently leads families to struggle with crop failure and hunger. This region suffers from extremes of drought and flooding, which frequently leads families to struggle with crop failure and hunger.
 
UGANDA OVERVIEW

Population

35,918,915

Religion

Christian

Weather

 
A Glimpse of Poverty in Eastern Uganda Uganda Overview
  • One of the biggest poverty-related challenges affecting children in eastern Uganda is the influence of negative cultural practices.
  • Parents often force their girls to drop out of school and marry during their early teens in order to obtain a traditional “bride price” from the groom’s family.
  • Female genital mutilation, though illegal, is still practiced by some groups.
  • Polygamy and the cultural tradition of wife inheritance have led to overpopulation and the spread of HIV and AIDS.
  • Food scarcity is an issue in this region, especially from January to April.
  • Most people in the eastern region, primarily subsistence farmers, do not have storage facilities, so when they harvest products, they eat or sell everything.
  • As a result, there is no food during the planting season and no money to meet other family needs. That’s why malnutrition is common among the children here.
LIFE
In Eastern Uganda

Geography & Climate

  • Uganda, known as the “Pearl of Africa” for its remarkable beauty, is rich with natural resources.
  • The country’s climate is tropical — warm and humid. There are two dry seasons, December to February and June to August.
  • The country, which is about the size as Oregon, is mostly a high plateau with a rim of mountains.
  • The highlands of eastern Uganda are home to several prominent mountain ranges and peaks.
  • The tallest peak in the region is Mount Elgon, an extinct volcano rising more than 14,000 feet above sea level. Rich volcanic soil eroding from Mount Elgon and other peaks make this land especially fertile.

Economy

The country’s fertile volcanic soil and numerous water sources make it well suited to agriculture, which employs more than 80 percent of Ugandans.

In the eastern region, coffee is a primary crop and the country’s main export, as well. However, subsistence farmers see little income from these exports.

Without irrigation systems, successful harvests are dependent on the weather, which is highly unpredictable. Too much rain is as destructive to crops as drought.

Less than 30 percent of adults have steady work.

Children at Home

Homes in rural eastern Uganda are small mud huts with dirt floors and straw roofs.

Children at home

Extended families usually live together in a cluster of huts.

One kitchen hut serves all the family members, and sometimes older huts are used as stables for cattle.

Millet, a cereal grain, is a staple food. Women spend a lot of time and effort removing the chaff from the millet grains then grinding those by hand into flour.

COMMUNITY
Uganda Community
Issues and Concerns
  • Most of the population makes their living through small-scale farming. Although the soil is ideal for farming, the region suffers from drought and flooding, which frequently leads to crop failure and famine.
  • In March 2010, landslides in Bududa, a district near the Mount Elgon mountain range, buried entire mountainside villages. More than 200 lives were lost, thousands were left homeless, and crops were destroyed.
  • Because of the threat of future landslides, the Ugandan government has declared that area uninhabitable and is in the process of relocating families to other areas.
  • People in the eastern region have been terrorized by the Lord’s Resistance Army, a rebel group fighting the government since 1987.
  • The group, known for its brutality, killed many families and kidnapped children when it moved into eastern Uganda between 2000 and 2002.
  • The eastern region ranks as Uganda’s highest producer and consumer of alcohol.
Local Needs and Challenges

Unpredictable weather

Many people in this area depend on subsistence farming to survive, and unpredictable weather patterns can devastate household incomes.

Chronic malnutrition

This problem can permanently affect children’s physical and mental health.

Harmful traditional practices

Practices such as female genital mutilation are harmful to girls’ well-being. These practices lead to high rates of teenage pregnancy, child marriage, and sexually transmitted diseases.

Poor health care access

Because access to health centers and qualified medical personnel is limited in this poor region, children too often die of preventable illnesses.

EDUCATION
Uganda education
Schools and Education
  • The school year in Uganda has three terms: February through April, the end of May through mid-August, and early September to late November.
  • Students typically attend school about 250 days each year.
  • Among Uganda’s population, only 66 percent of those over age 15 are able to read or write.
  • Among women, fewer than 58 percent are literate.

Compassion Uganda works to ensure that every registered child is able to attend school, and it provides additional support, including tutoring, at the child development centers.

At the Compassion Child Development Center

Compassion serves children in Uganda’s eastern region through church-based child development centers.

Here, children have the opportunity to develop their talents and abilities.

Their healthy physical development is assured through nutritious meals, hygiene training, and regular medical checkups.

They also learn about their heavenly Father and are introduced to salvation in Jesus Christ.

What Compassion Sponsorship Provides

In partnership with local churches, Compassion is bringing real help and hope to impoverished children in eastern Uganda, providing:

  • regular nutritious meals and snacks
  • health checkups and medical care as needed
  • the support needed to attend school
  • lessons for children and caregivers alike about the Bible-based principles of morality and family life in order to fight negative cultural influences
  • special encouragement for girls to succeed in their educational pursuits. Often, centers connect girls with caring Christian women from their partner churches to be role models and mentors.
  • training for caregivers in such topics as good parenting practices, the importance and how-to's of storing food and alternative income-generating skills, such as hairstyling and tailoring
  • seminars for caregivers about how to manage small-scale businesses. As a result, many have launched their own income-generating enterprises and have joined together to form savings and credit cooperatives.