Luo

Luo

Luo is the language most commonly spoken in northern Uganda. Luo is spoken by the two primary ethnic groups in this region of the country, the Acholi and Langi. Luo is also a term that refers to several ethnically and linguistically related ethnic groups that inhabit the area from Ethiopia through northern Uganda and the eastern part of the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Uganda

Northern Region

  • Towns in the battle-scarred northern region have few job opportunities, and families find it difficult to meet basic needs. Towns in the battle-scarred northern region have few job opportunities, and families find it difficult to meet basic needs.
  • Compassion centers are safe, welcoming places where children can build friendships and learn positive social interaction skills. Compassion centers are safe, welcoming places where children can build friendships and learn positive social interaction skills.
  • The Compassion curriculum enables tutors to provide the learning activities children need to overcome poverty and achieve a brighter future. The Compassion curriculum enables tutors to provide the learning activities children need to overcome poverty and achieve a brighter future.
  • The Compassion curriculum, adapted to the Ugandan culture, engages children in fun learning activities that cover all facets of life. The Compassion curriculum, adapted to the Ugandan culture, engages children in fun learning activities that cover all facets of life.
  • Thanks to caring sponsors and a program that is Christ-centered, children have the opportunity to experience God's love firsthand. Thanks to caring sponsors and a program that is Christ-centered, children have the opportunity to experience God's love firsthand.
  • Families in northern Uganda villages live in small, round huts with mud walls, dirt floors and thatched roofs. Families in northern Uganda villages live in small, round huts with mud walls, dirt floors and thatched roofs.
  • In this local market, typical of villages in the north, all kinds of items are sold, from used shoes to colorful fabrics to fresh produce. In this local market, typical of villages in the north, all kinds of items are sold, from used shoes to colorful fabrics to fresh produce.
 
UGANDA OVERVIEW

Population

35,918,915

Religion

Christian

Weather

 
A Glimpse of Poverty in Northern Uganda Uganda Overview
  • More than 70 percent of the population in northern Uganda live below the poverty line.
  • People in northern communities have only recently started to rebuild their lives after being terrorized for 20 years by the Lord’s Resistance Army insurgency.
  • Most families depend on subsistence farming, but the weather patterns in the north are harsh. There are frequent wildfires and often, a critical shortage of water.
  • These disasters lead to poor harvests, which lead to a lack of food, followed by nutritional deficiency and high mortality rates.
  • The incidence of HIV and AIDS in this region is the highest in the country, and many families are affected by its devastation.
  • The school dropout rate is also high, especially among girls, who typically marry during their early teen years.
COMMUNITY
Uganda Community
Issues and Concerns
  • The Lord’s Resistance Army’s (LRA) violence left more than 1.6 million people homeless. Tens of thousands of people were killed or kidnapped, and 20,000 children were forced to become child soldiers or sex slaves.
  • Although a tentative ceasefire agreement was reached with the Lord’s Resistance Army, people in this region still suffer from the conflict.
  • As many as 150,000 children have lost one or both parents. Also, many of the region’s families are starting from scratch, struggling to rebuild their lives.
  • Famine and crime are widespread.
  • Recent surveys show that this region has the highest rate of new HIV infections in all Uganda.
  • Another serious concern is the high rate of unemployment.
Local Needs and Challenges

Trauma from the LRA conflict

Children still suffer the devastating effects of the long conflict with the Lord’s Resistance Army. Many were kidnapped and sexually exploited or forced to bear arms, participating in killings and other atrocities.

Teen pregnancy

Children born to teenage mothers are very common in this region.

At-risk children

Many orphans and vulnerable children are living on their own. Often, they resort to child labor, prostitution, early marriage, or other detrimental options just to survive.

EDUCATION
Uganda education
Schools and Education
  • The school year in Uganda has three terms: February through April, the end of May through mid-August, and early September to late November.
  • Students typically attend school about 250 days each year.
  • Among Uganda’s population, only 66 percent of those over age 15 are able to read or write.
  • Among women, fewer than 58 percent are literate.

Compassion Uganda works to ensure that every registered child is able to attend school, and it provides additional support, including tutoring, at the child development centers.

At the Compassion Child Development Center

In northern Uganda, Compassion centers provide children the help and learning opportunities they need to reach their potential in Christ.

Along with nutritious meals for proper physical development, they also receive medical assistance and hygiene training to stay healthy.

Tutoring helps to make up for any school deficiencies, and most important, children learn about the love of their heavenly Father and are introduced to salvation in Jesus Christ.

What Compassion Sponsorship Provides

In partnership with local churches, Compassion is bringing real help and hope to impoverished children in northern Uganda, providing:

  • regular nutritious meals and snacks
  • health checkups and medical care as needed
  • the support needed to attend school
  • training for caregivers in such skills as food production and storage, fruit tree grafting and animal husbandry to help them be more productive
  • sources of safe water through various projects at the centers
  • training in hygiene and sanitation
  • HIV and AIDS interventions — such as treatment of opportunistic infections and voluntary counseling and testing
  • career days at centers to raise the awareness of caregivers and children about the importance of education and address the school dropout problem
  • tutoring for the children, as well as the fees uniforms, shoes, bags and books they need to attend school