Kampala

Kampala

Kampala is the capital city of Uganda, and is the most urbanized of Uganda's regions and the country's business hub. In addition to working in the business sector, many families in this central region of Uganda, including the city of Kampala, farm coffee and cotton, and raise goats and cattle to supplement their meager incomes. 


Kampala is the place the country's largest ethnic group, the Baganda, originated from.

Uganda

Central Region

  • In the urban slums in Uganda's central region, the health and well-being of children are at risk on a daily basis. In the urban slums in Uganda's central region, the health and well-being of children are at risk on a daily basis.
  • Children love their Compassion centers, havens of safety and unconditional acceptance, where they can laugh, play and just enjoy being kids. Children love their Compassion centers, havens of safety and unconditional acceptance, where they can laugh, play and just enjoy being kids.
  • The Compassion curriculum enables center tutors to provide the resources and learning activities that children need to grow and thrive. The Compassion curriculum enables center tutors to provide the resources and learning activities that children need to grow and thrive.
  • Sponsored children regularly write to their sponsors. And they are so encouraged when they receive letters back from their sponsors. Sponsored children regularly write to their sponsors. And they are so encouraged when they receive letters back from their sponsors.
  • These children are excited to show their new Bibles, which will help them learn even more about God's love for them. These children are excited to show their new Bibles, which will help them learn even more about God's love for them.
  • It is not uncommon for poor urban families with several members to live in one-room, rented shacks. It is not uncommon for poor urban families with several members to live in one-room, rented shacks.
  • In central Uganda's urban and semi-urban communities, many daily activities require challenging manual labor. In central Uganda's urban and semi-urban communities, many daily activities require challenging manual labor.
 
UGANDA OVERVIEW

Population

35,918,915

Religion

Christian

Weather

 
A Glimpse of Poverty in Central Uganda Uganda Overview
  • Central Uganda includes the capital, Kampala, where unemployment and underemployment are high.
  • Caregivers typically work at whatever jobs they can find in the industrial sector, earning a meager wage.
  • Caregivers are often absent from home, leaving children to fend for themselves. As a result, many go hungry and lack medical care.
  • Few families can afford the required fees for their children to attend school.
  • Domestic abuse is common in this region, and children are often neglected or battered by their parents.
  • Without proper parental guidance and nurture, children in central Uganda’s urban centers are also vulnerable to such bad influences as gang activity, crime and drug abuse.
  • Often children leave home to live on the streets, where the risk of exploitation is high.
  • In addition to the city of Kampala, this region includes some rural areas, which share a large portion of Lake Victoria with Tanzania and Kenya. Unemployment is a major problem in these more rural communities.
  • Without intervention, children in central Uganda have little hope of overcoming their circumstances and becoming happy, healthy, productive adults.
COMMUNITY
Uganda Community
Issues and Concerns
  • Unemployment is a critical issue in Kampala. Groups in Uganda occasionally hold demonstrations against the government. However, economic improvement is slow, and urban Ugandans continue to live in conditions of great suffering and need.
  • Because of the lack of opportunities, many of the city’s youths fall prey to drug abuse, crime and gang activity.
  • A large part of the capital city is located in a flood-prone region. The seasonal floods often lead to outbreaks of cholera and other illnesses caused by drinking unclean water.
  • Also, standing water — a prime breeding ground for mosquitoes — leads to thousands of cases of malaria each year. Children are affected more often than adults.
Local Needs and Challenges

Bad influences

Young people are faced with such pervasive influences as drug and alcohol abuse and the temptation to join violent gangs.

Imported media

Most TV and radio programs for youths are imported in developing countries, so much of the content isn’t relevant to local culture and often conveys violent images.

Domestic issues

Other dangers to children include sexual abuse and neglect, domestic violence, and disintegration of families.

Health dangers

Malaria, HIV and AIDS, malnutrition and lack of access to clean water also threaten children’s health.

EDUCATION
Uganda education
Schools and Education
  • The school year in Uganda has three terms: February through April, the end of May through mid-August, and early September to late November.
  • Students typically attend school about 250 days each year.
  • Among Uganda’s population, only 66 percent of those age 15 and over are able to read or write.
  • Among women, fewer than 58 percent are literate.

Compassion Uganda works to ensure that every registered child is able to attend school, and it provides additional support, including tutoring, at the child development centers.

At the Compassion Child Development Center

Compassion child development centers provide registered children in central Uganda with the resources and learning opportunities they need to overcome poverty.

Medical attention, extra nutrition, academic tutoring and vocational training help ensure that they will grow into healthy, happy, responsible adults.

Most important, the children have the opportunity to learn about the love of God and gift of salvation in Christ.

What Compassion Sponsorship Provides

In partnership with local churches, Compassion is bringing real help and hope to impoverished children in central Uganda, providing:

  • regular nutritious meals and snacks
  • health checkups and medical care as needed
  • the support needed to attend school
  • training in their rights and how to defend themselves against abuse
  • the Compassion curriculum of holistic child development, adapted to Ugandan children’s culture and needs
  • lessons that help children learn how to manage conflict and negative emotions
  • training in good parenting practices for caregivers, including healthy ways to discipline
  • income-generation training and opportunities for caregivers
  • education about God’s love and the life-transforming power of salvation in Christ