Uganda Gallery

Where We Work: Uganda
  • Janet Ponni helping mother with her shop

    Twelve-year-old Janet Pooni and her mother, Juliet, put vegetables on display for sale at the market near their home in Uganda. Juliet wasn't able to earn enough money to pay rent on their home, so the family now lives in a house borrowed from a family member. Juliet only attended one year of school, but thanks to Compassion's Child Sponsorship Program, Janet is able to continue her education. Her favorite subject is English, and she dreams of becoming a nurse.

  • Man pushes bicycle loaded with bananas

    A man pushes a bicycle loaded with bananas along a country road in Uganda. Approximately 82 percent of the labor force in Uganda is engaged in agriculture, but many families still struggle to earn enough income to provide for their children's basic needs. In partnership with local churches, Compassion addresses spiritual, economic, social and physical poverty in children.

  • Child carries large water container up path

    A young boy carries a large container along a dirt path to fetch water. Approximately 1.8 million children die each year as a result of diseases caused by unclean water and poor sanitation, but many lives are being saved by Compassion's Water of Life. One system can provide over 1 million gallons of safe drinking water; that is enough for 68 people for life.

  • Nicholas smiles in close-up

    Nicholas Sekikubo was abandoned by his mother when he was only six months old. He is being raised by his grandmother, who gardens and raises pigs for money, but the family still struggles to make ends meet. Now age four, Nicholas is registered with Compassion's Child Sponsorship Program in Uganda. It covers his school fees and other basic needs, empowering him to be released from poverty.

  • Women walk down road with water jugs

    Four women carry large water containers on their heads. Roughly 12 percent of the world's population, or 884 million people, do not have access to safe water. Many families are benefiting from Compassion's Water of Life filter systems. They can use dirty water from lakes, rivers, ponds or puddles; after flowing through the filter, the water comes out safe to drink.

  • Girls carry tubs to fetch water

    Some families, like this one, are forced to walk considerable distances to collect water. In rural Uganda, only 68 percent of the population has access to an improved drinking water source, such as piped water, a public tap, tube well, borehole, or a protected dug well (CIA's The World Factbook).

  • Kids looking over their shoulders

    Two children lean against a building in Uganda, a country where 38 percent of the population lives on less than $1.25 per day (UNICEF). Compassion partners with local churches in Uganda to break the cycle of poverty in children, releasing them into a future of hope and security. Its programs provide access to good nutrition, medical care and education.

  • Children carry loads of dry leaves down dirt road

    A group of children carries bundles of dried grass above their heads. Education is not mandatory in Uganda, but most families consider it to be important for their children's success. Most Ugandans attend primary education from age six through 13, and the Ugandan government subsidizes the cost for four children from each family to attend government-run primary schools.

  • Children smile together in front of church

    A group of children registered with Compassion in Uganda smile for a photo in front of their local church. Compassion's holistic child development programs are implemented exclusively through local churches in developing countries, which are best able to meet the unique, individual needs of children in poverty.

  • Ivan carries wood stick bundles with his aunt

    Ivan Nsubuga is seven years old and registered with Compassion's Child Sponsorship Program in Uganda. He and his aunt, Sylvia Nansubuga, carry bundles of sticks on their heads near their home. Ivan lives with HIV, but he is positive about his future. Compassion is providing Ivan with the resources he needs to stay healthy, get an education, and experience the love of Jesus.

  • Housing in Uganda

    Urban homes in central Uganda, like these in the Nsambya region of Kampala, are usually small structures with mud or brick walls and metal roofs. In some urban centers, the government has sponsored housing development projects to keep up with the growing population. Over recent years, the number of street children and families living in poverty in Kampala has increased noticeably.

  • City landscape

    Urban homes in central Uganda are usually small structures, with mud or brick walls and metal roofs. In some urban centers, the government has sponsored housing development projects to keep up with the growing population. Over recent years, the number of street children and families living in poverty in Kampala has increased noticeably.

  • Church and children playing

    Children play near a Compassion church partner that is nestled into the hills of Uganda. Through Compassion's holistic child development programs, children receive spiritual, economic, social and physical care, empowering them to be released from poverty in Jesus' name.

  • Women swing arms to sides as they dance together

    Mothers registered with Compassion's Child Survival Program in Uganda enjoy worshiping together outside the local church. The program provides mothers and babies with medical, nutritional, and spiritual care; it also teaches mothers income-generating activities that will help them provide for their families long term.

  • Women perform in song and dance together

    Mothers registered with Compassion's Child Survival Program in Uganda enjoy worshiping together outside the local church. An important aspect of the program is the fellowship time that mothers enjoy together. They often draw strength from each other as they share their stories, challenges, and successes as wives and mothers.

  • Young boy sits holding a small container solemnly inside his poor home

    A young boy sits on a dirt floor in Uganda. Extreme poverty has a devastating affect on children; it robs them of their childhood, drains their energy, and crushes their hope for a better future. Compassion's child development programs intervene in the lives of children in poverty with resources, love and encouragement, so they can reclaim their hopes and dreams.

  • Families stand in line to receive green netting packages

    Mothers and babies registered with Compassion's Child Survival Program in Uganda line up to be equipped with resources to prevent malaria. Malaria kills approximately one million children per year, many of them under age five and most of them in sub-Saharan Africa. Thanks to Compassion, these families will be protected with mosquito bed nets, instruction on how to use them, and education on other ways to reduce the number of mosquitos around their homes.

  • Man pedals bike with woman sitting behind down dirt community road

    A man and woman ride down a dusty street in Uganda on a bicycle. Compassion International began working in Uganda in 1980. Currently, they are assisting more than 71,600 children through 260 child development centers. Compassion partners with local churches in Uganda to release children from poverty through its holistic child development programs.

  • Charles Lwanga

    Ten-year-old Charles Lwanga sits with his family outside their home in Uganda. Charles contracted malaria when he was only three years old. The World Health Organization estimates that in 2010, 216 million clinical cases of malaria occurred globally, and 655,000 people died of malaria, most of them children in Africa. Compassion provides mosquito nets and education to help families fight back against malaria-infecting mosquitos.

  • View of fresh fruit and produce stands at market

    Fresh fruits and vegetables are displayed for sale at an open market in Uganda. Typical foods in Uganda include bananas, corn, rice, sweet potatoes, cassava, beans, and indigenous vegetables. Compassion's child development programs ensure registered children get nutritious food, as it is an important part of their development.

  • Fish vendor

    A Ugandan man holds ropes full of fish. Fish and fish products are important export commodities for the Ugandan economy.

  • Rows of boats

    Boats are lined up along the shore of Uganda as people try to sell the bananas they have recently harvested. Agriculture is an important industry in Uganda, employing 82 percent of the labor force. Still, approximately 38 percent of the population of Uganda lives in poverty (UNICEF).

  • Close-up of beans and rice being poured on plate

    Bean soup is spooned over white rice as a meal for children registered with Compassion's Child Sponsorship Program in Uganda. Compassion addresses the spiritual, economic, social and physical needs of children in poverty, and part of that is ensuring children have nutritious food.

  • Women give lesson in protective netting to crowd

    Child Survival Program staff in Uganda conduct an educational workshop on how to use a mosquito bed net. An estimated 90 percent of deaths due to malaria occur in Africa south of the Sahara; most of these deaths occur in children under five years of age. Compassion provides families with mosquito nets and education on how to prevent malaria, as well as treatment for those already suffering from the disease.

  • Ambrose Niwamany with mother

    Ambrose Niwamany is fourteen months old and sits with his mother, Florence Kawangy, in their home in Uganda. Florence grows crops to support her six children. Florence and Ambrose were registered with the Child Survival Program when he was just four days old. At the time, both mother and child were very weak. Compassion provided them with medical care and education on nutrition and hygiene, as well as with a mosquito net to protect them from malaria.

  • Joseph Ahimbisibwe doing homework in bed

    Fifteen-year-old Joseph Ahimbisibwe lies in bed reading his homework. Joseph has lived with his grandparents for four years, since his parents moved away to find work. Now, his grandparents are too old to farm and can't continue supporting Joseph and their other grandchildren. Through Compassion's program in Uganda, Joseph's needs are met; the family receives food, and Joseph receives an education.

  • Girls reading their bibles

    Three students study their Bibles together. In Uganda, approximately 42 percent of the population is Roman Catholic and 42 percent is Protestant (CIA's The World Factbook). Compassion's child development programs are Christ-centered; every registered child is given the opportunity to learn about Jesus and discover how to develop a lifelong relationship with God.

  • Ugandan neighborhood

    Slums like these are unfortunately common in Uganda. With a population of over 34 million, approximately 38 percent of Ugandans live in poverty (UNICEF). Additionally, the population growth rate of Uganda is a staggering 3.32 percent, one of the highest in the world (CIA's The World Factbook). With an increasing population comes the need for more infrastructure, resources, and jobs.

  • Ugandan women

    Two Ugandan women go about their daily chores, while two children play nearby. In the past 30 years, extreme poverty has been cut in half, from 52 percent of the world’s population living in extreme poverty in 1981 to less than 26 percent today. Many countries, such as Uganda, still have a long way to go.

  • Emily takes instruction during her sewing class

    Emily Tumwikirize carries her two-year-old son, Jones Ahumuza, in a sling on her back while she participates in a sewing class through her local church. Emily and Jones are registered in Compassion's Child Survival Program in Uganda, which is teaching her income-generating skills, like sewing. Emily has also learned about the importance of good nutrition and of boiling water before drinking it, to ensure she and her children stay healthy.

  • Cityscape in Uganda

    Kampala is the largest city and capital of Uganda. Compassion International began working in Uganda in 1980. Currently, they are assisting more than 71,600 children through over 260 child development centers in the country. Compassion partners with local churches in Uganda to release children from poverty through its holistic child development programs.

  • Sharon washes dishes outside

    Sharon Nabisinde washes dishes outside her home in Uganda. Growing up, food was scarce, as her family's small income from farming wasn't enough to provide for their needs. Through Compassion's Child Sponsorship Program, Sharon's family received resources to help them generate more income, like high-quality seeds for farming and animals. Sharon's grades in school have improved significantly since joining Compassion, and she is trying to decide whether she wants to be a teacher or a lawyer.

  • Yusta Kabahuma carrying water

    Fifteen-year-old Yusta Kabahuma runs errands for her family. She is registered in Compassion's Child Sponsorship Program in Uganda, which is teaching her how to be responsible. Compassion is paying her school fees, so she can continue her education. Yusta wants to be a lawyer when she is older, so she can help reduce the number of crimes in her community and ensure justice is fair.

  • An older woman

    An elderly Ugandan woman leans against a mud wall. Nearly half of the population of Uganda is younger than 15 years of age, and the life expectancy in the country is just under 54 years of age (CIA's The World Factbook).

  • Woman touches fruit in bowl at market

    A Ugandan woman sells fruits and vegetables at an open market stand. Typical foods in Uganda include bananas, corn, rice, sweet potatoes, cassava, beans, and indigenous vegetables.

  • Close-up of woman at market braiding colorful straw

    A Ugandan woman braids together thin strips of grass. Ugandan art typically includes woven textiles, pottery, sculpture, oral poetry, ritual dance and drama.

  • Deborah's aunt sits on floor of her home

    A woman sits on a mat in her home in Uganda. She is a peasant farmer and is raising her niece, 13-year-old Deborah, who is registered with Compassion's Child Sponsorship Program in Uganda. Deborah lost both of her parents to HIV/AIDS, and both she and her aunt are HIV positive. Thanks to Compassion, Deborah takes medicine every day for her disease and is able to live a normal life. She enjoys netball and dodge ball and wants to be a doctor when she gets older.

  • Racheal Ninsimma with mother hoeing

    Twelve-year-old Racheal Ninsimma works in the garden with her mother, Justine. They grow sweet potatoes and beans to feed their family and sell in the local market. Racheal is registered with Compassion's Child Sponsorship Program in Uganda, which provides her with medical care, education, love, and support to overcome her circumstances.

  • Women work to tie leaves together in a bundle

    Two women harvest bundles of crops, tied together with leaves. Agriculture employs approximately 82 percent of the labor force in Uganda, but many families still struggle to provide for their children's needs. Compassion's child development programs ensure children have the resources and opportunities they need to grow into fulfilled Christian adults.