Tanzania Gallery

Where We Work: Tanzania
  • Samson Yobo Japhet at a market

    Ten-year-old Samson Yobo Japhet joins his grandmother at the local food market. He has lived with his grandparents since he was two years old, after his mother remarried another man and abandoned him. For income, Samson and his grandparents grow crops and make charcoal, which they then sell in the market.

  • Samson Yobo Japhet at a market

    Ten-year-old Samson Yobo Japhet (right) helps his grandmother purchase grains and beans from the market. Samson has lived with his grandparents since he was two years old, after his mother remarried another man and abandoned him. He is registered with Compassion's Child Sponsorship Program in Tanzania, which provides him with medical care, nutritious food, and help with his education.

  • Samson Yobo Japhet at food stand

    Ten-year-old Samson Yobo Japhet (right) helps his grandmother buy food at the market. Samson is registered with Compassion's Child Sponsorship Program in Tanzania. His grandmother says that the education, medical care and other benefits Samson gets from the program are more valuable to the family than she could have imagined.

  • Irene Stephen riding on mom's back

    Twenty-month-old Irene Stephen can't stop smiling as she rides on her mom's back. Irene and her mother, Joyce Mtae, are registered in Compassion's Child Survival Program in Tanzania, which is giving Irene the medical care and nutrition she needs at this young age.

  • Young child being carried on back of older child

    A child is being carried on the back of an older child near their home in Tanzania, where around 36 percent of the population lives under the poverty line. Over 44 percent of the population of Tanzania is between zero and 14 years of age, according to CIA's The World Factbook.

  • Pendo Shurai Mollel walking near huts

    Fifteen-year-old Pendo Shurai Mollel is registered with Compassion's Child Sponsorship Program in Tanzania. Her mother was never able to attend school, but thanks to her sponsor, Pendo is currently enrolled in secondary school. Her favorite subject is math.

  • Children praying

    A group of school children clasp their hands in prayer. In Tanzania, approximately 30 percent of the population is Christian and 35 percent is Muslim; the remaining 35 percent follow indigenous beliefs. Compassion's implementing church partners present the Gospel to children in a non-coercive, culturally sensitive way. Children do not have to make a commitment to Christ to continue receiving the benefits of Compassion’s program.

  • Women cooking

    Two women stir large pots of food. The most popular food in Tanzania is ugali, a porridge made by boiling cornmeal. It can be comparable to grits, which is eaten in the southern region of the United States. Ugali is often eaten with stew, vegetables or meat. Goat, chicken and mutton are the most common meats eaten in Tanzania.

  • Children with head coverings

    Children with scarves covering their heads walk along a street in Tanzania. Nearly 115 million children around the world are not in school. Globally, some 53 percent of the children out of primary school are girls. Education is considered a source of livelihood in Tanzania, as it provides students with skills, confidence, and the ability to be trained.

  • Irene Stephen sitting on mom's lap

    Joyce Mtae and her daughter, 20-month-old Irene Stephen, sit outside their home in Tanzania, which is made of clay, dirt, and wooden beams. Compassion's Child Survival Program is teaching Joyce how to provide the best possible care for Irene, ensuring she has a healthy start to life.

  • Hut homes

    A group of small children sit in the dirt outside a group of homes in Tanzania, where approximately 36 percent of the population lives under the poverty line (CIA's The World Factbook). In developing countries, approximately 130 million children and teens—age 17 or under—have lost one or both parents.

  • Two small children standing in hut doorway

    Two small children stand barefoot in the doorway of their hut in Tanzania. In sub-Saharan Africa, 55 percent of children under five years old have never been registered; worldwide, nearly 50 million children each year are not registered and begin life with no identity.

  • Three children reading together

    Eleven-year-old Aisha Mohamed Mbuguni reads a book with two other children in her home. She and her grandmother live in Tanzania; they don't have electricity or running water in their home. Compassion's Child Sponsorship Program is allowing Aisha to attend school, where her favorite subject is English.

  • City scenery with hills in background

    A city sits at the base of hills in Tanzania. Despite its problems with poverty, Tanzania is home to Mt. Kilimanjaro, the highest peak in Africa, and is rich in natural resources and minerals.

  • Woman with child on back building fire

    A woman in Tanzania builds a fire outside of her home. A young child is wrapped to her back. Tanzania has made significant strides in reducing its child mortality rate, falling from 158 deaths for every 1,000 live births in 1990 to 68 deaths per 1,000 in 2011 (according to UNICEF). Compassion's Child Survival Program in Tanzania aims to get that number even lower.

  • Infant child with older child

    A boy holds an infant as he plays with a homemade toy truck near their home. According to the World Health Organization, early childhood is the most important phase for overall development throughout the lifespan. Compassion's Child Survival Program works with infants and toddlers during this crucial time.

  • Group gathering water from water tank

    A group of young women collect water from their local water tank. Worldwide, approximately 425 million children under 18 do not have safe water. According to CIA's The World Factbook, approximately 53 percent of the population of Tanzania has access to an improved drinking water source, such as piped water, a public tap, tube well, borehole, protected dug well, or rainwater collection.

  • Goodness Daniel Lemetei plowing land

    Fourteen-year-old Goodness Daniel Lemetei works in a field with some of her family members. For a living, they grow maize and beans and raise cattle. Goodness is registered with Compassion's Child Sponsorship Program in Tanzania. Her sponsor sent a gift that she used to buy goats, which have provided an additional source of income for her family. Through Compassion, Goodness is able to continue her education and would like to be a doctor one day.