Sri Lanka Gallery

Where We Work: Sri Lanka
  • Sri Lankan fisherman by boats

    Fishermen dock their boats in the Chilaw community of Sri Lanka. The fishing industry is important for Sri Lankan food security, as well as for its social and economic life. Fish is also one of the nation's exports.

  • LK CS1 baby girl in close up.

    A little girl in Compassion's Child Survival Program in Sri Lanka looks up at the camera. The black dot on her forehead is a bindi. Traditionally, when a girl is single the bindi is black, and when they are married it's red. For some individuals, the bindi is simply decorative; for others, it's of primordial importance and influences the lives of girls from a young age.

  • Sri Lankan vegetable market stand

    A Sri Lankan farmer displays the fruits of his labor for purchase. Commonly grown produce in Sri Lanka includes rice, sugarcane, grains, pulses, oilseed, spices, vegetables, fruit, tea, rubber, and coconuts. For those families that can't afford to provide for their children's basic needs, Compassion's child development programs in Sri Lanka intervene to release children from poverty.

  • Sri Lankan toddler boy

    A toddler walks down an alley near his home in Sri Lanka. Compassion's work in the country began in 2010, with local churches reaching out to more than 1,000 babies and their mothers through partnership with Compassion's Child Survival Program. The program is designed to rescue and nurture children from the time of conception to age four who would otherwise have a very low chance of survival or healthy development.

  • Nisan Sala sitting on the ground eating

    Nisan Sala (right) enjoys a meal with a friend at her local Compassion center in Sri Lanka. Nisan's mother had a short temper before she and Nisan joined the Child Survival Program. She used to fight with her husband and hit her children. Now, thanks to Compassion's teaching, she treats her family with love and kindness.

  • Sri Lankan children smiling

    Three children pose for a photo in Sri Lanka, a country that values the importance of learning. Over the past two decades, primary school enrollment for both boys and girls in Sri Lanka has been well over 90 percent, while secondary education enrollment has been above 80 percent. Due in part to the success of high enrollment across the country, Sri Lanka is, academically speaking, one of the best performing countries in South Asia.

  • Sri Lankan man seperating fish

    A man works at a fish market in the Chilaw community of Sri Lanka. The fishing industry is important for Sri Lankan food security, as well as for its social and economic life. Fish is also one of the nation's exports.

  • Sri Lankan Fisherman

    This Sri Lankan fisherman in the Chilaw community poses for a photo. Approximately 9 percent of the population of Sri Lanka lives in poverty, while approximately 4.5 percent are unemployed. Compassion partners with local churches in Sri Lanka to help children living in poverty grow up to be fulfilled Christian adults.

  • Sri Lanka grains and spices being sold

    Grains and spices are sold at a local market stand in Sri Lanka. Rice is a staple in the Sri Lankan diet, and curries are used to make a variety of rice dishes, from meat, to fish, to vegetable-based options. Coconut milk is a common ingredient. A typical Sri Lankan meal also includes side dishes that can be extremely spicy, such as chutneys, pickles and sambols, which are chili-based sauces.

  • Sri Lankan girl smiling

    A Sri Lankan girl smiles brightly at the camera. Children under age 18 make up nearly 48 percent of the population of the world's least developed countries, compared to 21 percent of the population of the world's industrialized nations.

  • Sri Lanka Tea Leaves

    Tea plantations are an important part of the Sri Lankan economy. Globally, one in six children five to 14 years old—about 16 percent of all children in this age group—is involved in child labor in developing countries. In Sri Lanka, nearly 60 per cent of all working children are reported to be agricultural workers, according to the International Labour Organization of the United Nations.

  • Project child T. Angel walking with other children

    Eight-year-old Angel walks through a field with her friends. Her father works for a tea farmer, but it's difficult for her family to survival on his small salary. They live in a community plagued with alcoholism and abuse, and it's difficult for Angel to concentrate on her studies at night. Thanks to Compassion's local church partner in her community in Sri Lanka, Angel has a safe place to play and study.

  • Sri Lankan market

    A man purchases fruit from a market in Sri Lanka. Commonly grown produce in Sri Lanka includes rice, sugarcane, grains, pulses, oilseed, spices, vegetables, fruit, tea, rubber, and coconuts. For those families that can't afford to provide for their children's basic needs, Compassion's child development programs in Sri Lanka intervene to release children from poverty.

  • Sri Lankan women working

    A woman picks tea leaves in the fields of Sri Lanka. The tea industry is one of the country's main sources of foreign exchange and a significant source of income for the laborers who work in the fields. According to the International Labour Organization of the United Nations, nearly 60 per cent of all working children in Sri Lanka are reported to be agricultural workers.

  • Many Buddhist statues stand outside the temple

    Large Buddhist statues sit outside a temple in Sri Lanka. Buddhism is the primary religion in the country, with approximately 69 percent of the population proclaiming to be Buddhist. Compassion's implementing church partners present the Gospel to children in a non-coercive, culturally sensitive way. Children do not have to make a commitment to Christ to continue receiving the benefits of Compassion’s program.

  • Sri Lanka taxis

    Taxi drivers in Sri Lanka wait for customers. Approximately nine percent of the population of Sri Lanka lives in poverty, while approximately 4.5 percent is unemployed.

  • Buddhism

    Though Sri Lanka does not have a state religion, the constitution accords Buddhism the "foremost place" and commits the government to protecting it. Approximately 69 percent of the population of Sri Lanka is Buddhist. Compassion's implementing church partners present the Gospel to children in a non-coercive, culturally sensitive way. Children do not have to make a commitment to Christ to continue receiving the benefits of Compassion’s program.

  • Two large skyscrapers

    The Twin Towers of the World Trade Centre Colombo dominate the skyline of Sri Lanka's largest city, Colombo, which has a population of approximately 750,000.

  • Sri Lankan vegetable market stand

    A Sri Lankan man sells his produce at a vegetable market stand. Approximately 963 million people across the world are hungry, and more than six million children die from malnutrition each year. Compassion's child development programs ensure children receive good nutrition, as well as medical care, love and support.

  • Sri Lanka waterfall

    Though Sri Lanka's landscape is mostly flat, with rolling plains, there are some mountains in the south-central interior of the country. Some of the environmental issues facing the country include deforestation, soil erosion, pollution to freshwater resources, and waste disposal.

  • An elephant's eye in Sri Lanka

    The Sri Lankan elephant is one of three recognized subspecies of the Asian elephant and is native to Sri Lanka. It is considered endangered, as the population has declined by at least 50 percent over the last three generations due to habitat loss and degradation.