Manila

Manila

Manila is the capital city of the Philippines. Located on the eastern shore of Manila Bay, the city of Manila has a population of 1.6 million. Manila has a strengths in the arts, commerce, education and media.

Philippines

Urban Region

  • In the shadow of city skyscrapers, poor urban families make their homes out of whatever scrap materials they can find. In the shadow of city skyscrapers, poor urban families make their homes out of whatever scrap materials they can find.
  • Children in the Compassion program have the opportunity to grow in every way: mind, body, heart and spirit. Children in the Compassion program have the opportunity to grow in every way: mind, body, heart and spirit.
  • Education is vital for a child to escape poverty. Sponsored children receive educational support and hope for a better future. Education is vital for a child to escape poverty. Sponsored children receive educational support and hope for a better future.
  • The Compassion curriculum is adapted specifically to urban Filipino children’s needs. The Compassion curriculum is adapted specifically to urban Filipino children’s needs.
  • Children love program days at their Compassion centers where they participate in engaging learning activities that help them grow and thrive. Children love program days at their Compassion centers where they participate in engaging learning activities that help them grow and thrive.
  • The environment of the Philippines’ urban slums is not conducive to children’s healthy development. The environment of the Philippines’ urban slums is not conducive to children’s healthy development.
  • Cooking utensils and fuel are hard to come by in the Philippines’ urban slums. Cooking utensils and fuel are hard to come by in the Philippines’ urban slums.
 
PHILIPPINES OVERVIEW

Population

103,775,002

Religion

Roman Catholic

Weather

 
A Glimpse of Poverty in the Philippines' Urban Region Philippines Overview

The Philippines’ urban centers, such as Quezon City and Manila, are home to millions of desperately poor families.

  • In crowded slums, children typically live in a dark, humid, unsanitary environment where gang members, drug dealers and prostitutes also reside.
  • In Manila, more than 20 percent of the population survives on less than U.S.$1 per day.
  • Most families don’t have their own toilets, and they are forced to illegally tap electricity to add a little comfort to their homes.
  • Most families don’t have a stove, cooking utensils or fuel to cook with.
  • Other than street foods, inexpensive, ready-to-cook noodles and junk food are also consumed. Although families save money on such foods, they sacrifice their children’s health.
  • Some homes are so crowded that entire families sleep side-by-side on wooden floors. Others are forced to sleep in shifts inside their tiny living spaces.
COMMUNITY
Philippines Community
Issues and Concerns

Families who relocate to the cities are looking for opportunity. However, the reality falls far from their hopes and expectations.

  • More than 30 percent of those living in urban areas settle in informal slums.
  • These ramshackle cities exist in low-lying floodplains, along riverbanks, and near highways, railroads or dumpsites.
  • The growing urban population has increased the demand for basic social services and increased competition for limited employment.
  • In Manila, one out of 10 adults is unemployed.
Local Needs and Challenges

Because of poverty, children in the Philippines’ urban centers often suffer malnutrition, as well as illness and injury from unsafe living conditions.

  • Many urban children do not attend school and are vulnerable to the negative influences that surround them.
  • At an early age, children often become involved in gangs, prostitution and other dangerous activities.
  • Many Compassion-assisted children confess that if they had not become a part of the program, they likely would have followed the same path.
EDUCATION
Philippines education
Schools and Education

The typical school year in Manila runs from June through March.

  • Children must attend either a morning or afternoon shift because the number of students is far greater than the number of teachers.
  • Classrooms are overcrowded, and children rarely receive one-on-one attention.
  • Elementary school lasts six years, and secondary, or high school, is four years.
  • Most families in metro Manila put a high premium on education.
  • The region has the highest basic literacy rate in the country at 97 percent.
  • While public primary and secondary education is free, most Compassion-assisted children need support for school uniforms, textbooks and transportation expenses.
At the Compassion Child Development Center

Eighty of Compassion Philippines child development centers are in urban areas. In Manila alone, Compassion ministers to more than 5,000 children in desperate poverty.

At the centers, children come each week to learn practical lessons in health and nutrition.

Compassion centers serve as a haven where they can go anytime to be safe, accepted and enjoy learning and just being kids. It is not uncommon to see sponsored children, especially youth, hanging out at their center on non-program activity days to escape the harsh realities of their living situations.

What Compassion Sponsorship Provides

Registered children receive:

  • regular nutritious meals and snacks
  • health checkups and medical care as needed
  • the support needed to attend school
  • Lessons in hygiene habits such as frequent hand washing and brushing teeth
  • Their first toothbrush

Most important, assisted children learn that God loves them and has a plan for their lives. They are encouraged and equipped to work toward a future free from poverty and a life of squalor in the slums.

COMPASSION IN THE PHILIPPINES' URBAN REGION
Working Through the Local Church

Compassion’s ministry in the Philippines, as in every country where we work, is based in the local church. It is an ideal partnership because evangelical churches are springing up throughout the country.

  • Church partners prepare cost-effective, delicious, nutritious meals for the children, which also serve as a way to educate parents about healthy eating habits.
  • Since many children in urban Philippines live on flood plains, Compassion has organized a streamlined disaster relief process in these areas.
  • Because Filipinos have lost confidence in other institutions, including the government, they are embracing the church as a source of humanitarian help and hope.
  • Several of our church partners have noticed that even when people are suspicious of their motives in helping children, it takes only a few weeks for families to realize the sincerity of the church and gladly send their children to be registered in the program.
  • Often entire families begin attending the church services and eventually become members.
Compassion in the Philippines’ Rural Region
How Compassion Works in the Philippines*
  • Compassion began working in the Philippines in 1972.
  • Currently more than 75,800 children are registered in 346 child development centers.
  • Most children attend the center for eight hours per week.
  • Philippines also has 160 students in the Leadership Development Program and 1,655 mothers and their babies served through the Child Survival Program.

*Numbers current as of Spring 2015

More Photos from the Philippines