Filipino

Filipino

Natives of the Philippines islands are called Filipinos. There are about 104 million Filipinos living in the Philippines and about 11 million Filipinos living outside of the Philippines. There are around 180 languages spoken by Filipinos.

Philippines

Rural Region

  • Homes in rural areas are typically made of bamboo or wood from coconut trees, with thatched roofs. Homes in rural areas are typically made of bamboo or wood from coconut trees, with thatched roofs.
  • An important component of the Compassion program is Christian education and spiritual nurture. An important component of the Compassion program is Christian education and spiritual nurture.
  • Education is vital for a child to escape poverty. Sponsored children receive educational support and hope for a better future. Education is vital for a child to escape poverty. Sponsored children receive educational support and hope for a better future.
  • Many rural communities are located on the coast, where families engage in subsistence fishing. Many rural communities are located on the coast, where families engage in subsistence fishing.
  • Children in the Compassion program have the opportunity to grow in every way: mind, body, heart and spirit. Children in the Compassion program have the opportunity to grow in every way: mind, body, heart and spirit.
  • Compassion centers are warm and welcoming places where children can enjoy laughing, playing, learning and just being kids. Compassion centers are warm and welcoming places where children can enjoy laughing, playing, learning and just being kids.
  • In the Philippines’ rural communities, sources of safe water are scarce. In the Philippines’ rural communities, sources of safe water are scarce.
 
PHILIPPINES OVERVIEW

Population

103,775,002

Religion

Roman Catholic

Weather

 
A Glimpse of Poverty in the Philippines' Rural Region Philippines Overview

For impoverished children in rural areas of the Philippines, life’s basics – food, clothing, shelter and health care – are hard to come by.

  • Some parents call their lifestyle “one day, one eat,” which means they eat only one meal a day.
  • Most children wake up in the morning to little or no breakfast, and they live in makeshift homes that can’t properly protect them from the elements.
  • At night, families typically cram into one small room and sleep on a wooden bamboo floor with flickering light from a kerosene lamp.
  • Poor rural parents work hard as farmers, fishermen, pedicab drivers and vendors, yet they earn very little.
  • Each year, about 1 million Filipinos leave the country for work abroad.
  • There is also a lack of good educational opportunities for children.
  • Many young people simply give up and get involved in gangs or drug abuse to numb their feelings of hopelessness.
COMMUNITY
Philippines Community
Issues and Concerns

Rural Philippines is primarily agricultural, with sugar as its main product.

  • Most villages average a 9 percent unemployment rate, but even for farmers, who technically are unemployed, there is little steady income.
  • Because of poverty, many children drop out of school to work in sugarcane plantations.
  • Here, they are exploited and forced to work long hours for meager pay.
Local Needs and Challenges
  • Children in rural Philippines are vulnerable to illness because few medical facilities are available.
  • Even when facilities are accessible, their parents are too poor to seek help.
  • Many children die from easily preventable and treatable diseases, including infections, colds and diarrhea. 
  • Extreme poverty also means that child labor is an issue.

Each year, devastating typhoons destroy the homes and livelihoods of rural families. In November 2013, for example, a typhoon took the lives of thousands of Filipinos.

Compassion’s Disaster Relief Fund is frequently used to help Philippine families victimized by such natural disasters.

COMPASSION IN THE PHILIPPINES' RURAL REGION
Working Through the Local Church

Compassion local church partners in rural Filipino communities operate child development centers that provide what children may be lacking at home – safety, learning and fun.

  • Church partners usually conduct program activities on the weekends. But most assisted children still come to the center on weekdays just to hang out, be with friends and get away from their uncomfortable home situations.
  • It is also in the centers that they find friends who will not lead them into alcohol, drugs and crime.
  • Because Filipinos have lost confidence in other institutions, including the government, they are embracing the church as a source of humanitarian help and hope.
  • Several of our church partners have noticed that even when people are suspicious of their motives in helping children, it takes only a few weeks for families to realize the sincerity of the church and gladly send their children to be registered in the program.
  • Often entire families begin attending the church services and eventually become members.
Compassion in the Philippines’ Rural Region
How Compassion Works in the Philippines*
  • Compassion began working in the Philippines in 1972.
  • Currently more than 75,800 children are registered in 346 child development centers.
  • Most children attend the center for eight hours per week.
  • Philippines also has 160 students in the Leadership Development Program and 1,655 mothers and their babies served through the Child Survival Program.

*Numbers current as of Spring 2015

More Photos from the Philippines