Mexican Desserts

Mexico Desserts
Mexico

Indigenous Region

  • Homes in this region lack running water, electricity, paved roads and transportation. There are also few employment opportunities. Homes in this region lack running water, electricity, paved roads and transportation. There are also few employment opportunities.
  • Children registered at Compassion-assisted child development centers have a safe place to play, study and learn about God’s love. Children registered at Compassion-assisted child development centers have a safe place to play, study and learn about God’s love.
  • Students at Compassion centers have plenty of activities to keep them engaged. Here, students work on their painting and art skills. Students at Compassion centers have plenty of activities to keep them engaged. Here, students work on their painting and art skills.
  • Thanks to caring sponsors and a program that is Christ-centered, children have the opportunity to experience God's love firsthand. Thanks to caring sponsors and a program that is Christ-centered, children have the opportunity to experience God's love firsthand.
  • Even the simple act of drawing a picture is a way to give children relief from the unrelenting poverty they experience each day. Even the simple act of drawing a picture is a way to give children relief from the unrelenting poverty they experience each day.
  • The remaining indigenous residents of Mexico typically live in sparse houses made of straw or wood. The remaining indigenous residents of Mexico typically live in sparse houses made of straw or wood.
  • Youths in Mexico’s indigenous regions are expected to do a large share of work at home, causing many to drop out of school. Youths in Mexico’s indigenous regions are expected to do a large share of work at home, causing many to drop out of school.
 
MEXICO OVERVIEW

Population

120,286,655

Religion

Roman Catholic

Weather

 
A Glimpse of Poverty in Indigenous Mexico  Indigenous Mexico
  • Of the more than 11 million indigenous people in Mexico, more than 95 percent live in poverty.
  • Only half of indigenous children 12 and older have completed elementary school.
  • Most of the indigenous communities in Mexico are isolated and in the mountains, so children have to walk to their Compassion centers, schools and back to their homes - going up and down the hills of their town.
  • Challenges that indigenous children face include child labor, malnutrition and lack of education.
  • There aren’t many job opportunities in indigenous communities, or services like electricity, running water, paved streets or transportation.
  • Children share home chores, which include carrying water, gathering fire wood, and working in the fields.
  • Most families live on what they grow or raise, and they farm according to the seasons. Droughts, excessive rain, cold temperatures, plagues and many other factors affect their crop production and income.
LIFE
In Indigenous Mexico

Geography & Climate

  • Mexico is located in one of the Earth’s most dynamic tectonic areas. It is a part of the circum-Pacific “Ring of Fire” — a region of active volcanism and frequent seismic activity.
  • Among its towering volcanic peaks are Citlaltépetl (18,406 feet) and the active volcano Popocatépetl (17,930 feet).
  • Mexico is bounded to the west and south by the Pacific Ocean, to the east by the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea, and to the southeast by Guatemala and Belize.
  • Because of its vast size and topographic diversity, Mexico has a wide array of climatic conditions.

Economy

The indigenous people of Mexico represent the most extreme levels of poverty.

Most indigenous people rely on farming as their primary occupation. Few own their own land, and a family’s average daily income is $5.

More than half are unemployed.

Children at Home

Each of the 62 indigenous groups in Mexico has their own language, attire and traditions. They also are Mexico’s poorest of the poor.

Children at home

Living in the most remote locations, they are virtually cut off from the rest of the country. That means, outside their own small agricultural efforts, indigenous people have no way to earn income. When indigenous adults leave their communities to look for work in other locations, they suffer severe discrimination.

Even Mexico’s government does little to reach and raise the living standards of indigenous people. Few indigenous communities have passable roads, schools, or other public services such as water, electricity or sanitation.

Though descended from Mexico’s proud ancestors, such as the Aztecs and Maya, indigenous people are ashamed of their identity, and children grow up feeling inferior.

COMMUNITY
Issues and Concerns
  • Traditionally, the areas where indigenous populations live are the most difficult to access. Getting into and out of these communities involves long walks to bus stations - and long bus rides to the city. This makes travel to the city, where hospitals and clinics are located, difficult.
  • Many adults must make the long journey into the city daily as they travel to find work, leaving their children home alone for hours, or even days, at a time.
  • Those who do find work in the city are discriminated against, and are often the victims of violence.
Local Needs and Challenges

Malnutrition and illness

Mexico’s indigenous children are some of the most disadvantaged in the Western Hemisphere. Children in indigenous communities suffer from malnutrition, intestinal infections and respiratory infections.

Poor sanitation and lack of safe water

These two common situations lead to such life-threatening illnesses as cholera and typhoid. However, because of extreme poverty and the remoteness of their communities, parents can’t find medical assistance when their children get sick.

Inadequate schools

Teachers are poorly qualified, and they visit remote indigenous communities to conduct classes only sporadically.

EDUCATION
Indigenous education
Schools and Education
  • Lack of schools and teachers are among the main issues for the indigenous people.
  • Most communities have no high schools, 20 percent of children will never attend school at all.
  • The government has made little headway in providing better education for indigenous people, primarily because of language barriers.
  • The few middle and high schools in these communities are usually satellite schools, with few classes offered.

Compassion Mexico works to ensure that every registered child is able to attend school. It also provides additional support, including tutoring, at the child development centers.

At the Compassion Child Development Center

Child development centers in Mexico’s indigenous communities provide registered children with a place to learn and grow.

Children who have been largely discriminated against are treated as equals, and are provided a safe place to study and build friendships.

Compassion-assisted children attend health classes, tutoring sessions and Bible studies at the center. They also spend time writing to and praying for their sponsors.

What Compassion Sponsorship Provides

In partnership with local churches, Compassion is bringing real help and hope to impoverished indigenous children in Mexico, providing …

  • Regular nutritious meals and snacks
  • Health checkups and medical care as needed
  • The support needed to attend school
  • Awareness-raising for parents about the dangers of child labor and the importance of education for improving their children’s future. This is a major change, especially for girls, because outside of the Compassion programs, indigenous girls usually aren’t sent to school.