Papua

Papua

Indonesia’s Papua Province is the country’s largest. It is located on the island of New Guinea. Divided roughly into equal halves, the western half of New Guinea is occupied by Indonesia and includes the Papua Province and also the province of West Papua. The eastern half of the island is the independent country of Papua New Guinea.

Indonesia

Papua Province

  • These women use water from the stream to prepare sago, a starch used in many Papuan meals. These women use water from the stream to prepare sago, a starch used in many Papuan meals.
  • At their Compassion centers, children enjoy laughing, playing and just being kids. At their Compassion centers, children enjoy laughing, playing and just being kids.
  • Education is vital for a child to escape poverty. Sponsored children receive educational support and hope for a better future. Education is vital for a child to escape poverty. Sponsored children receive educational support and hope for a better future.
  • Children in the Compassion program have the opportunity to grow in every way: mind, body, heart and spirit. Children in the Compassion program have the opportunity to grow in every way: mind, body, heart and spirit.
  • This family's home is small and crudely made of boards, with a metal roof. This family's home is small and crudely made of boards, with a metal roof.
  • The Compassion curriculum includes many practical life-skills lessons. The Compassion curriculum includes many practical life-skills lessons.
  • These men have collected cocoa pods from the nearby forest and are drying the beans in the sun. These men have collected cocoa pods from the nearby forest and are drying the beans in the sun.
 
INDONESIA OVERVIEW

Population

253,609,643

Religion

Islam

Weather

 
A Glimpse of Poverty in Indonesia's Papua Province Indonesia Overview
  • Growing up happy and healthy in Papua Province, the most impoverished of Indonesia’s 33 provinces, is a daunting challenge for children.
  • Impoverished parents typically work at day-labor jobs for meager wages.
  • Meals are usually limited to vegetables and potatoes, and children commonly suffer from malnutrition.
  • The widespread lack of access to safe water and adequate sanitation means children are also susceptible to a wide range of illnesses including malaria and leprosy.
  • The number of HIV infections is rising in the region, dramatically threatening the well-being of families.
  • Education opportunities are limited, with poorly equipped schools, an inadequate number of teachers, and outdated curriculum.
  • Despairing adults often fall into drinking and gambling addictions; domestic violence and child abuse are common.
LIFE
In Indonesia's Papua Province

Geography & Climate

  • Indonesia is an archipelago in Southeast Asia consisting of 17,508 islands (6,000 inhabited) and straddling the equator.
  • It is the world’s largest country comprised solely of islands.
  • The biggest islands are Sumatra, Java (the most populous), Bali, Kalimantan (Indonesia's part of Borneo), Sulawesi (Celebes), the Nusa Tenggara islands, the Moluccas Islands, and Irian Jaya (also called West Papua), the western part of New Guinea.
  • Indonesia, part of the “ring of fire,” has the most number of active volcanoes in the world. Java, for example, has 50 active volcanoes.
  • The topography of Indonesia’s islands varies but consists mainly of coastal lowlands. Some of Indonesia’s larger islands (Sumatra and Java, for example) have large interior mountains.
  • Natural disasters, especially earthquakes, are common in Indonesia. On Dec. 26, 2004, a 9.1 to 9.3 magnitude earthquake struck in the Indian Ocean, triggering a large tsunami that devastated many Indonesian islands.
  • Indonesia’s climate is tropical with hot and humid weather in lower elevations. In the highlands, temperatures are more moderate.

Economy

Indonesia’s economy centers on agriculture and industry. The main agricultural products include rice, coffee, sugarcane, palm oil, poultry and pork.

Indonesia’s largest industrial products include petroleum, plywood, rubber, textiles and cement.

Indonesia’s economy is helped by its strategic location along major sea lanes from the Indian Ocean to the Pacific Ocean.

Today Indonesia is a growing tourist hotspot because of its tropical landscape in places such as Bali.

The child labor (ages 5-14) rate stands at 7 percent.

The average annual household income is U.S.$5,000.

The population living below the poverty line is 11.7 percent.

Throughout the country, 16 percent of the population lives on U.S.$1.25 per day or less.

Children at Home

Homes of impoverished families in urban Sentani are typically made of cement blocks with metal roofs.

Children at home

These dwellings usually must accommodate several members of an extended family.

In rural Wamena, homes are the traditional Papuan honai, a structure made of wood with a thatched roof.

As in the city, several relatives beyond the nuclear family typically live together.

COMMUNITY
Indonesia Community
Issues and Concerns
  • The rising HIV/AIDS epidemic is a concern in both Sentani and Wamena.
  • The tropical climate contributes to the proliferation of mosquitoes carrying malaria and dengue fever.
  • Wamena lacks adequate sanitation. People use the nearby forest as their toilet, and without waste disposal, the health hazards are great.
  • Among the Dani people in Wamena, the ancient tribal custom remains: men’s single responsibility in life is to wage war on other tribes. As a result, men today typically do little more than sit in the market, drinking, gambling and chatting, while women bear complete responsibility for earning an income and caring for the home. It is not unusual for men in this area to have more than one wife.
Local Needs and Challenges

Climate

The year-round tropical climate fosters the proliferation of malaria- and dengue-carrying mosquitoes.

Sanitation

The lack of adequate sanitation facilities, especially in rural Wamena, puts children’s health at risk.

Education

Few opportunities exist for obtaining a quality education due to poorly equipped schools and unqualified teachers. In the city, children attend school an average of six years. In rural Wamena, the average attendance is two years.

EDUCATION
Indonesia education
Schools and Education
  • On average, children in Sentani attend school for six years, with only 53 percent completing high school.
  • In Wamena, where children often have to walk for miles to get to the nearest school, the average school attendance is two years. Fewer than half of the adults in this rural area can read or write.
At the Compassion Child Development Center

In partnership with local churches, Compassion brings much-needed hope to Papua Province’s children in need.

To fight malnutrition, children are provided healthy meals at their Compassion centers, and they receive the medical assistance that their parents cannot afford.

Children also learn good hygiene and sanitation practices.

At their centers, children receive the extra tutoring they need to make up for deficiencies in their schools.

In addition, they learn practical lessons based on the Compassion curriculum, adapted to their culture and needs, including how to live a healthy lifestyle and protect themselves from abuse.

Their spiritual life is also nurtured through prayer, Bible study and worship.

For parents, monthly meetings conducted by staff emphasize the importance of education and teach good parenting methods.

What Compassion Sponsorship Provides

In partnership with local churches, Compassion is bringing help and hope to children in need in Papua Province, providing them with:

  • regular nutritious meals and snacks
  • health checkups and medical care as needed
  • the support needed to attend school
  • health and hygiene training
  • access to special services like surgeries and disaster relief
  • mentoring to help children discover their incredible value as God’s children