Honduras Culture

Honduras Culture
Honduras

Rural Region

  • Parents of registered children are taught through the program how to operate a motorized, three-wheel cab so they can earn a salary. Parents of registered children are taught through the program how to operate a motorized, three-wheel cab so they can earn a salary.
  • Children in the Compassion program have the opportunity to grow in every way: mind, body, heart and spirit. Children in the Compassion program have the opportunity to grow in every way: mind, body, heart and spirit.
  • Children registered at child development centers find a place to play, make friends, learn about Jesus and feel loved and protected. Children registered at child development centers find a place to play, make friends, learn about Jesus and feel loved and protected.
  • Rural Honduran homes often rely on poorly ventilated stoves for cooking, causing respiratory issues among children. Rural Honduran homes often rely on poorly ventilated stoves for cooking, causing respiratory issues among children.
  • Children at Compassion’s church-run centers have the opportunity to play and just be kids while in a safe and loving environment. Children at Compassion’s church-run centers have the opportunity to play and just be kids while in a safe and loving environment.
  • Sponsored children regularly write to their sponsors. And they are so encouraged when they receive letters back from their sponsors. Sponsored children regularly write to their sponsors. And they are so encouraged when they  receive letters back from their sponsors.
  • Typical homes in impoverished rural areas are no more than ramshackle sheds, made with scrap metal and wood. Typical homes in impoverished rural areas are no more than ramshackle sheds, made with scrap metal and wood.
 
HONDURAS OVERVIEW

Population

8,598,561

Religion

Roman Catholic

Weather

 
A Glimpse of Poverty in Rural Honduras Rural Honduras

Extreme poverty is pervasive in rural Honduras. Low education levels limit adults’ abilities to find jobs.

Because of their low incomes, parents find they can’t afford to send their children to school. Children stay at home or are forced into labor.

Large families live in small, overcrowded homes.

In parts of northern Honduras, people have built makeshift homes along rivers where they are vulnerable to landslides and floods.

Many families also don’t have access to clean water, sewage systems, health care or medicine.

Children commonly suffer from parasites, lice and cavities.

Homes along rivers typically have rudimentary ovens with no ventilation, which causes respiratory and eye problems in children.

COMMUNITY
Issues and Concerns Honduras Rural Community
  • Poor food production and low incomes lead to an extremely low standard of living in the Honduran countryside, where malnutrition and illness are common.
  • The typical diet of rural families consists primarily of corn, made into tortillas, and beans. Common foods also include cassava, plantains, rice and coffee. Meat is found infrequently in most rural diets. Green vegetables also are scarce.
  • More than one-quarter of rural families have no access to clean, safe water. And just more than half have adequate sanitation.
  • Children suffer from easily preventable diseases, such as bacterial diarrhea and hepatitis A.
  • Children also commonly suffer from mosquito-borne malaria and dengue fever.
Local Needs and Challenges

Extreme poverty

In rural, agriculturally based communities, economic needs stem from lack of access to land and basic services and low crop productivity.

Lack of employment opportunities

The lack of jobs is a driving force behind the country’s high level of emigration from rural regions to cities.

Severe weather

The rural areas are prone to hurricanes and flooding, particularly in communities located near the Caribbean coast.

EDUCATION
Honduras education
Schools and Education
  • In Honduras, education is free and compulsory for all children ages 7 to 14. However, the country still suffers from widespread illiteracy — more than 80 percent in rural areas.
  • The rural-urban disparity in education is marked: Nearly 60 percent of urban youths, but only 25 percent of rural youths, are enrolled in grades seven through nine.
  • For grades 10 through 12, about 38 percent of urban youths are enrolled, compared with 15 percent of rural youths.
  • In many rural areas, schools are not easily accessible.
  • Schools often don’t have enough teachers, and multiple grades are taught together by the same teacher.
  • Some schools are so understaffed that teachers have up to 80 children in one classroom.

Compassion Honduras works to ensure that every registered child is able to attend school, and it provides additional support, including tutoring, at the child development centers.

At the Compassion Child Development Center

At Compassion-assisted child development centers in Honduras’ rural communities, children receive the help and learning opportunities they need to reach their potential in Christ.

Along with nutritious meals for healthy physical development, they also receive medical assistance and hygiene training to stay healthy.

Tutoring helps to make up for any school deficiencies, and, most important, they learn about the love of their heavenly Father.

What Compassion Sponsorship Provides

In partnership with local churches, Compassion is bringing real help and hope to impoverished children in rural Honduras, providing:

  • regular nutritious meals and snacks
  • health checkups and medical care as needed
  • the support needed to attend school
  • training in personal hygiene, such as how to brush their teeth and wash their hands
  • prayer, counseling and appropriate interventions for those from abusive homes
  • literacy and income-generation training for parents so they can better provide for their children
  • spiritual retreats, where children play soccer, swim and learn about the Word of God