Haitian Food

In Haiti, many families are living on less than U.S.$1 a day and cannot afford to send their children to school. At Compassion's child development centers, children eat nutritious Haitian food and also receive health checkups regularly. And each day at the center means they will study God’s Word to better understand His love for them.
Haiti

Northern Region

  • Seashores are polluted with garbage and other waste as homes push to the edge of the land. Those living here use boats to get around. Seashores are polluted with garbage and other waste as homes push to the edge of the land. Those living here use boats to get around.
  • As Haiti’s public schools don’t have playgrounds, children often gather to play at the child development center after school. As Haiti’s public schools don’t have playgrounds, children often gather to play at the child development center after school.
  • Education is vital for a child to escape poverty. Sponsored children receive educational support and hope for a better future. Education is vital for a child to escape poverty. Sponsored children receive educational support and hope for a better future.
  • Boat transportation is common in the northern region as it allows communities to exchange their goods and do business together. Boat transportation is common in the northern region as it allows communities to exchange their goods and do business together.
  • Children in the Compassion program have the opportunity to grow in every way: mind, body, heart and spirit. Children in the Compassion program have the opportunity to grow in every way: mind, body, heart and spirit.
  • Some homes in rural northern areas are made of sheets of tin. Cooking takes place outside and mudslides are a hazard for families here. Some homes in rural northern areas are made of sheets of tin. Cooking takes place outside and mudslides are a hazard for families here.
  • Children, especially the boys, at the center like to play hide-and-seek during school recess. Some even prefer it to having lunch! Children, especially the boys, at the center like to play hide-and-seek during school recess. Some even prefer it to having lunch!
 
HAITI OVERVIEW

Population

9,996,731

Religion

Roman Catholic

Weather

 
A Glimpse of Poverty in Northern Haiti Northern Haiti
  • People living in the northern region of Haiti face serious problems with environmental degradation caused by poor resource management and a lack of education on hygiene and sanitation.
  • Recent surveys conducted in some Compassion-assisted child development centers in this region revealed that more than 40 percent of residents do not have latrines, using rivers and the sea for their toilet and waste disposal needs.
  • Northern region residents primarily use water from rivers and lakes for cooking and cleaning. Those who can’t afford to buy a gallon of drinking water for 11 cents drink water straight from rivers and other sources that are polluted.
  • Drinking untreated water poses great risk for cholera, which is common here.
COMMUNITY
Western Haiti Community
Issues and Concerns
  • Subsistence farming in the north is a precarious existence because people have no modern tools or effective irrigation methods.
  • Large families rely on small, overworked farm plots, and even good harvests rarely produce enough to meet families’ nutritional needs.
  • To compound farmers’ struggles, the wide variation in annual precipitation often causes droughts, crop failure and famine.
Local Needs and Challenges

Lack of education access

Many families in the north live on less than U.S.$1 a day and can’t afford to send their children to school. The children who do attend typically travel up to two hours each day.

Poor infrastructure

Lack of sufficient roads makes travel difficult not only to schools but for families to sell goods in other parts of the country.

EDUCATION
Haiti education
Schools and Education
  • Officially, education in Haiti is compulsory and free for children between ages 6 and 12. However, only 15 percent of schools in the country are operated by the government.
  • Eight-five percent of schools are private institutions that charge fees. Few poor Haitian families can afford these fees, and as a result, only about half of primary-school age children attend school, and less than 2 percent of children finish secondary school.
  • Haiti’s school year runs September through June. Children typically attend Monday through Friday, from 8 a.m. to 2 or 3 p.m.
  • Although Creole is the everyday language of most Haitians, it is considered a second-class language, and French is the language of instruction in the schools.

Compassion Haiti works to ensure that every registered child is able to attend school, and it provides additional support, including tutoring, at the child development centers.

At the Compassion Child Development Center

Compassion serves children in northern Haiti through local, church-based child development centers. These centers are havens of love and learning for registered children.

Here, children receive nutritious meals, hygiene training, and tutoring to attain standard academic milestones.

They are also encouraged to develop their talents and abilities. Most important, children learn about God’s love and the gift of salvation in Christ.

What Compassion Sponsorship Provides

In partnership with local churches, Compassion is bringing real help and hope to impoverished children in northern Haiti, providing:

  • regular nutritious meals and snacks
  • health checkups and medical care as needed
  • the support needed to attend school
  • water filters for their homes to reduce the incidence of cholera and other waterborne illnesses
  • latrines in their communities
  • education about proper sanitation and hygiene techniques