Gold Coast

Gold Coast The Gold Coast is the region now known as Ghana - home to nearly 24 million people. The Gold Coast was formally a British Colony on the Gulf of Guinea, but gained its independence in 1957 and is now known as Ghana. The Gold Coast region consists of sandy beaches and marsh in some places, and the hinterland, where the land rises several hundred feet above sea level. Those that live along the coast make a meager living from fishing, and others that live in rural regions of Ghana work as subsistence farmers.
Ghana

Rural Region

  • Children play in the dusty streets of a rural area. Here, access to some of life's most basic needs, such as clean water and health care, can be a struggle. Children play in the dusty streets of a rural area. Here, access to some of life's most basic needs, such as clean water and health care, can be a struggle.
  • While registered children attend Sunday school as well as classes to help them with their studies, they also have plenty of time to play, and just be kids. While registered children attend Sunday school as well as classes to help them with their studies, they also have plenty of time to play, and just be kids.
  • The Compassion curriculum enables tutors to provide the learning activities children need to overcome poverty and achieve a brighter future. The Compassion curriculum enables tutors to provide the learning activities children need to overcome poverty and achieve a brighter future.
  • Communal eating is a customary practice in many parts among many ethnic groups in Ghana. Communal eating is a customary practice in many parts among many ethnic groups in Ghana.
  • Thanks to caring sponsors and a program that is Christ-centered, children have the opportunity to experience God's love firsthand. Thanks to caring sponsors and a program that is Christ-centered, children have the opportunity to experience God's love firsthand.
  • At some Compassion centers, children learn to play musical instruments, such as these children brushing up on their brass skills. At some Compassion centers, children learn to play musical instruments, such as these children brushing up on their brass skills.
  • Most Ghana residents who live in rural areas depend on subsistence farming for food. Most Ghana residents who live in rural areas depend on subsistence farming for food.
 
GHANA OVERVIEW

Population

25,758,108

Religion

Christian

Weather

 
A Glimpse of Poverty in Rural Ghana Ghana Overview
  • Subsistence farming is the primary occupation of people living in Ghana’s rural regions.
  • Because most roads to rural areas are in bad shape, farmers have a hard time transporting their produce to markets to sell, and thus farmers rarely make enough to make ends meet.
  • Rural communities in Ghana often lack basic needs such as water, medical care and education.
  • For household water needs, most people rely on dirty ponds, rivers and uncovered hand-dug wells. As a result, they are exposed to illnesses such as parasites, cholera and diarrhea.
  • Many children don’t attend school in rural areas. Some parents earn so little that they simply can’t afford to send their children to school, while others are ignorant about the benefits of education.
  • Many children are left to grow up by themselves and so preventable illnesses, teenage pregnancies, rape and juvenile delinquency are common.
COMMUNITY
Ghana Community
Issues and Concerns
  • Like many rural areas, communities here are in need of better schools, more job opportunities, higher wages, and better access to health care.
  • Most rural communities lack the belief that they can break free from the struggle of subsistence living.
  • A lack of hope seems to be at the root of many of these extreme poverty issues.
Local Needs and Challenges

Access to medical care

Many villages are isolated, and the nearest medical center can be as much as three hours away.

Poor education

Schools are also scarce. The few schools that do exist in rural areas are poorly equipped and overcrowded.

Lack of safe water and adequate sanitation

Very few homes in rural Ghana have adequate sanitation facilities. As a result, children often suffer from illnesses caused by unclean water and poor hygiene.

EDUCATION
Ghana education
Schools and Education
  • Although primary and junior secondary school education is tuition-free and mandatory, rural Ghana society is largely undereducated.
  • Many children have to walk several miles to get to their schools, and most classrooms lack basic supplies and materials.
  • Access to each successive level of education remains severely limited by lack of facilities.
  • Only about 30 percent of junior secondary school graduates are able to gain admission to senior secondary schools, and only about 35 percent of senior secondary school graduates go on to attend a university.
  • Some children must drop out to work and supplement the family income.

Compassion Ghana works to ensure that every registered child is able to attend school, and it provides additional support, including tutoring, at the child development centers.

At the Compassion Child Development Center

Child development centers in rural communities provide registered children with a place to learn, grow and study.

Sponsorship allows staff to provide Bible teaching, medical exams, health and hygiene instruction, educational tours and classes, social events, tutoring, and life-skills and vocational training.

Centers also offer opportunities for involvement for the parents or guardians of sponsored children. These children also spend time writing to and praying for their sponsors.

What Compassion Sponsorship Provides

In partnership with local churches, Compassion is bringing help and hope to rural Ghana’s children in need, providing:  

  • regular nutritious meals and snacks
  • health checkups and medical care as needed
  • the support needed to attend school
  • caregiver education that helps them make informed decisions, love their children, provide for them, support them and be there for them
  • income-generating activities for parents so they can better provide for their families
  • Complementary Intervention projects that improve living conditions for children and their families. For instance, in rural regions that lack clean water, water filters are distributed to children or mechanized boreholes for permanent, clean-water wells are dug.
  • support for local church partners to address issues affecting children spiritually, socio-emotionally, mentally and physically
  • country-appropriate curriculum that helps restore children holistically