Accra Ghana

Accra Ghana

Accra, Ghana is the capital city of Ghana. Accra, Ghana is also the largest city in Ghana with a population of more than 2.2 million. While Accra, Ghana is a well developed city filled with people from all regions of the country, there are also incredibly deprived communities that lack all of the most basic needs. In Accra, Ghana the contrast between the rich and the poor is startling - just one street can be the difference between a wealthy neighborhood and abject squalor.

Ghana

Urban Region

  • The overcrowded outskirts of the capital city of Accra are, in part, a result of heavy migration of rural residents in search of work. The overcrowded outskirts of the capital city of Accra are, in part, a result of heavy migration of rural residents in search of work.
  • Registering with Compassion allows these girls in urban Ghana to attend school. Registering with Compassion allows these girls in urban Ghana to attend school.
  • Sponsored children regularly write to their sponsors. And they are so encouraged when they receive letters back from their sponsors. Sponsored children regularly write to their sponsors. And they are so encouraged when they  receive letters back from their sponsors.
  • Children in the Compassion program have the opportunity to grow in every way: mind, body, heart and spirit. Children in the Compassion program have the opportunity to grow in every way: mind, body, heart and spirit.
  • A typical compound house like this in Ghana is like an apartment building where many families can rent a room or apartment. A typical compound house like this in Ghana is like an apartment building where many families can rent a room or apartment.
  • This is an aerial view of a popular commercial hub called "Circle," in a Ghana city, where activities go on 24 hours a day. This is an aerial view of a popular commercial hub called
  • Children in a Compassion center participate in classroom activities. They are also given the opportunity to learn about God's love for them. Children in a Compassion center participate in classroom activities. They are also given the opportunity to learn about God's love for them.
 
GHANA OVERVIEW

Population

25,758,108

Religion

Christian

Weather

 
A Glimpse of Poverty in Urban Ghana Ghana Overview
  • Ghana’s urban regions are crowded with migrants from rural areas seeking a better life.
  • They end up staying and having children, whom they can’t provide for because good-paying jobs are hard to find for migrants lacking professional skills.
  • Families fall into poverty and don’t have enough food, clothing or money for health care.
  • Children born into impoverished urban families struggle to survive – every year 60,000 don’t make it to their 5th birthday. Those who survive often must fend for themselves early in life.
  • Neglected children frequently take to the streets, and thus there are high numbers of street children and teenage parents in urban areas.
  • Children often must work at a young age, either to help support their families or because they’re on their own and need income.
  • When kids are working or drifting in the streets, they are not in school and are more likely to turn to crime.
COMMUNITY
Ghana Community
Issues and Concerns
  • Many who live in Accra have emigrated from other countries in search of jobs. Yet jobs are scarce.
  • Since many people are looking for accommodations, the rent for a decent flat or room is very high, and owners exploit this situation. Some are very restrictive with rental terms.
  • Crime — especially armed robbery — is a major issue.
  • Internet fraud is on the rise in Accra, and more and more youths are getting involved.
Local Needs and Challenges

Dangerous environment

The crowded, unsanitary urban environment is filled with hazards that threaten children’s physical well-being.

Lack of clean water

This lack frequently leads to diseases, some of which can be life threatening. But few parents can afford to pay a doctor when their children become ill.

Poor education

Urban schools are usually overcrowded and poorly equipped. This problem is reflected in the fact that one-third of Ghana’s people age 15 and over cannot read or write.

EDUCATION
Ghana education
Schools and Education
  • Although primary and junior secondary education is tuition-free and mandatory, most of Ghana society is largely undereducated.
  • Many children must walk through dangerous slum areas to get to their schools, and most classrooms lack basic supplies and materials.
  • Access to each successive level of education remains severely limited by lack of funds and, in some cases, facilities.
  • Only about 30 percent of junior secondary school graduates are able to gain admission to senior secondary schools, and only about 35 percent of senior secondary school graduates go on to attend a university.
  • Some children must drop out to work and supplement the family income.

Compassion Ghana works to ensure that every registered child is able to attend school, and we provide additional support, including tutoring, at the child development centers.

At the Compassion Child Development Center

Child development centers in urban communities provide registered children with a place to learn, grow and study.

Sponsorship allows staff to provide Bible teaching, medical exams, health and hygiene instruction, educational tours and classes, social events, tutoring, and life-skills and vocational training.

Centers offer opportunities for involvement for the parents or guardians of sponsored children.

Children also spend time writing to and praying for their sponsors.

What Compassion Sponsorship Provides

In partnership with local churches, Compassion is bringing help and hope to rural Ghana’s children in need, providing:  

  • regular nutritious meals and snacks
  • health checkups and medical care as needed
  • the support needed to attend school
  • caregiver education that helps them make informed decisions, love their children, provide for them, support them and be there for them
  • income-generating activities for parents so they can better provide for their families
  • educational and physical activities in a safe environment to help keep children engaged and learning – and off the streets
  • support for local church partners to address issues affecting children spiritually, socio-emotionally, mentally and physically
  • country-appropriate curriculum that helps restore children holistically